Identifying lithological heterogeneity

Concurrent mixing and crystallisation seen through to reveal lithological heterogeneity.

Concurrent mixing and crystallisation destroys the primary geochemical variability leaving the mantle. MgO tracks the progressive crystallisation of basalts, whilst Nb/Zr, an incompatible trace element ratio records the collapse in primary chemical diversity that occurs in response to magma mixing in the crust. Primitive basalts, with MgO > 9.5 wt%, show the greatest geochemical diversity, which correlates with major element composition, implying lithological heterogeneity in the source. Figure modified from Shorttle & Maclennan (2011).

Our understanding of the mantle, long thought to be largely homogeneous in its major element composition, has undergone significant revision in the last decade as increasing evidence points towards it containing lithological heterogeneity. In this paper we present new evidence from Iceland that demonstrates the presence of pyroxenitic components in the plume source. Using a novel data projection (shown above) we account for fractional crystallisation processes and concurrent mixing and crystallisation to see through to the major element – trace element relationships characteristic of enriched and depleted mantle domains.

We also consider the consequences of lithological heterogeneity for melt production. Iceland is characterised by high crustal thicknesses, perhaps up to 40 km at the island’s centre (Darbyshire et al., 2000), and the eruption of enriched basalts. This combination has led some to claim that an enriched, fusible, source lithology is alone enough to explain the high crustal thickness observed (Foulger & Anderson, 2005). However, the thermodynamic modelling we present in this paper of a bi-lithological peridotite-pyroxenite mantle shows that the latent heat cost of melting requires significant excess temperature (> 100°C) even in the case of a pure pyroxenite mantle.


Online [Department repository, full text]: http://eprints.esc.cam.ac.uk/2228/7/ggge2058.pdf

Online [Publisher]: http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2011GC003748

ReferenceShorttle, Oliver, and John Maclennan. Compositional trends of Icelandic basalts: Implications for short–length scale lithological heterogeneity in mantle plumes. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 12, no. 11 (2011).