AGU 2015

I will be at AGU for the whole week: on Thursday speaking about work we have been doing combining geochemical and geophysical indicators of mantle potential temperature to understand what drives melting anomalies on Earth; followed by a talk on Friday presenting some early results investigating the thermodynamics of melt transport and the chemical signals this produces in basalts. On Wednesday Simon Matthews has a poster with new Al-olivine thermometry data from Iceland and neat modelling results showing how petrological estimates of crystallisation temperature can be used to estimate mantle potential temperature – the essence: mantle lithology matters!

Lithology and temperature: How key mantle variables control rift volcanism


Authors: Oliver Shorttle, Mark Hoggard, Simon Matthews, John Maclennan

Session: T44C: Tectonic, Magmatic, and Geodynamic Studies of Extensional Processes: Applications in Iceland and the Nubia-Somalia-Arabia Plate System II

When/where: Thursday 17th December, 16:15 in Moscone South 304

Here we pick apart the various roles of mantle potential temperature and source composition in generating melting anomalies on Earth.  Taking Iceland as a case study, we show how crustal production rates (a proxy for melt flux) and estimates of the enriched-lithology’s melt supply to the crust can be used to constrain the source composition.  Knowing the source composition we can then make more accurate estimates of the thermal structure of the melting region, and so invert petrological estimates of crystallisation temperature into mantle potential temperature. Irrespective of Iceland’s source composition, the mantle must represent a thermal anomaly of at least 100ºC.

We extend our analysis to rifting globally by using a compilation of continental margin crustal thickness estimates. By making reasonable assumptions about mantle source composition, these crustal thickness estimates track the post break-up thermal evolution of the mantle. These observations allow us to evaluate the hypothesis that even away from plumes continental insulation drives up mantle potential temperature prior to rifting. However, the crustal thickness records provide little evidence for a long term increase of mantle temperature due to continental insulation: either it decays rapidly following break-up, or was not generated during the pre-break-up lifetime of the continent.

Geochemical constraints on magma formation and transport processes


Authors: Oliver Shorttle, Paula Antoshechkina, Paul Asimow, Rajdeep Dasgupta, John Rudge

Session: DI51C: Melt and Liquids in Earth and Planetary Interiors II

When/where: Friday 18th December, 08:30 in Moscone South 303

The key question motivating this work is what proportion of geochemical diversity in basalts can be attributed to the melt transport history a given melt has experienced? The implications of this question are broad, as it leads to us questioning the origin of geochemical differences observed between ocean islands and mid-ocean ridges, or as a function of spreading rate and mantle potential temperature: Are these various tectonic regimes driving different styles and rates of melt transport that map into geochemical differences?

To answer these questions we performed some simple calculations of focussed melt flow to quantify the geochemical diversity generated just from varying the amount of melt focusing.  We observe a significant response in terms of the major and trace element chemistry of basalts, suggesting that some portion of local geochemical variability could be mapping in the diverse transport history melts have experienced through the mantle.

The Temperature of the Icelandic Mantle Plume from Aluminium-in-Olivine Thermometry


Authors: Simon Matthews, Oliver Shorttle, John Maclennan

Session: DI31B: Melt and Liquids in Earth and Planetary Interiors

When/where: Wednesday 16th December, 08:00 in Moscone South – Poster Hall

Petrological estimates of mantle potential temperature are a key observation underpinning our models of mantle geodynamics. However, the process of going from the direct observable, a crystallisation temperature, back into a mantle potential temperature is not straight forward. A crystallisation temperature at the very list gives a minimum bound on the mantle temperature, but depending on the thermal history of the magma that crystal grew from, and the magma’s origin within the melting region, that temperature could be 100ºC less than the temperature of initial mantle melting.  To recover the mantle temperature before melting requires a model for the thermal evolution of the mantle during decompression and partial melting.

Here we combine a multi-lithology model of mantle melting with new Al-olivine thermometer estimates for the crystallisation temperature of forsteritic Icelandic olivines. By using geochemical and geophysical constraints on melt production we are able to arrive at a valid range of potential temperatures for the Icelandic mantle that are consistent with available observations.  Combining constraints in this way enables us to propagate uncertainty through relevant model parameters and analytical uncertainty on the crystallisation temperature, to obtain rigorously defined uncertainties. All viable model solutions show the Icelandic mantle to be significantly hotter than typical mid-ocean ridge mantle.